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? >> the other point to make is the cardinals who weren't appointed by benedict were appointed by john paul 2 rrp. so i think they're all of like mind. tt sense papal elections are unlike the iowa caucuses where you have debate. that won't happen. it's more about style and tone than they are about substance. so i don't think you'll get a new pope who will repeal church teaching on abortion or gay marriage. but you could get a pope who uses the post modern world a little more and put a more positive face to the message. >> i want to go to ben we'der man. are the crowds saying anything now? >> people are very much waiting to see and to hear from pope benedict. now, the the italian authorities said they were expecting up to 200,000 people to come today and we know that even in some italian schools, the children have been told if they're an september today, they will not be penalized. in order to accommodate the large crowd that's expected, he's doing it outside. people from all over the world here. we're joined actually by one guest, kevin, from washington, d.c., who is visiting rome. your thoughts
intellectual who consolidated and continued the legacy of john paul ii. a boulder more confident catholic church, more willing to engage in public debates, but part of benedict's legacy will inevitably the scandals on his watch. particularly the exploding sex abuse scandals across the catholic world, not just in the west and the united states, but other parts of the world, and also the -- the massive vatican leak scandal that rocked this place in the last couple of years, which led to sort of internal meltdown in terms of the aberrations of the place so on the one hand, a strong, confident leader, who presided, whether it's his fault or force of circumstance, over some of the most serious scandals ever to rock the vatican, an important and mixed legacy. >> john, you mentioned -- according to you and people who watch this very, very closely. much more closely than the rest of us really, he been giving some signs, signals, laying the ground work for the possibility of resignation. and he had some health issues as well and that could come as news to some people. we've seen a pope. most peopl
, not so many times, but the last one i was here, and that was because a pope died. john paul ii died after living his last years infirmed and in visible pain. now we have a transition, we have a living pope. you're not watching a funeral before the next pope is elected. you're not watching the world's heads of state come here to pay their respects to the departed pope. you're seeing a much different kind of transition. john al whlen, what is pope benedict going to do the rest of the day? >> normally the wednesday audience, the pope gives religious instruction rooted in scripture. but today i would imagine that knowing the momentous nature of what's happening, it's probably going to be uncharacteristically personal for benedict. i will imagine he will talk about what was in his mind and in his heart as he reached this remarkable decision to step as sight and what his hopes for the church are going forward. >> and high school a moment of opportunity and possibility, many saying this needs to be a moment for reform. what kind of reform do you think needs to happen? of course in our minds are
didn't see anything like what we saw during the twilight of the john paul years, with the series of hospitalizations here in rome, or sort of spectacular public collapses, i think it's more simply that benedict xvi's diagnosis is that he's going to be celebrating his 86th birthday in april. we have seen him pairing back public commitments and so on. he believes that the energy required to lead the catholic church forward at this moment is beyond his capacities. and i think he's decided therefore, not to wait for a moment of crisis, but while he's still capable of doing so, to make the decision to step aside and let somebody else take the baton. >> reverend martin, people are using words like shocking, unprecedented, why is this such a surprise? why didn't anybody expect this except for his inner circle? >> well, it hasn't happened for centuries, and you know, as john allen was saying, there had been speculation, there was speculation about john paul ii and people knew benedict was frail and in a sense diminishing physically, but i think the fact it hadn't happened so long means i
ornamental gardens, as a small farm. john paul ii took wonderful walks here. benedict xvi i'm told is a much, much more private man, expected to spend a long time in his rooms here. he'll be here for about two months while they restore his home at the vatican where he will eventually spend the rest of his life. guys? >> all right, becky anderson, thank you very much. we'll check back in with you. >>> here to help us walk through today is monsignor rick hi hillgartner. i wanted to walk through what is going to happen today when the pope meets with the cardinals. can you walk us through that? >> sure. >> yesterday in st. peter's square there were upwards of 50,000 people or more giving that public witness. this will be the most with his closest collaborators over the years. the pope's personal collaborators are the bishops throughout the world and in a particular way it's the cardinals standing at the heart of those, many of the cardinals of the people who workday to day in the vatican who work with the pope on a regular basis. who see him week in, week out. the rest of the cardinals spread th
that led back to the vatican as well. a lot of questions about what it would be. john paul ii, thinking about resigning, prepared letters of resignation, and both from 197. he turned 75 and 80, never went ahead with the resignations that he was thinking about. but it will be interesting to hear more as we understand why the pope -- the reasons behind why the pope has been called to resign, which will happen on february 28th. >>> other stories making news this morning. john berman has that too. >>> talking about the storm here. families and businesses in seven counties trying to recover from a violent tornado that tore a path through southern mississippi on sunday. ripping apart homes, shops, and causing damage to a university campus. 4,000 homes are still without power. 16 people are injured. and a storm chaser captured this terrifying sight. a funnel cloud in hattiesburg. that took the brunt of a series of reported twisters that just pounded the region overnight. >>> meanwhile, the northeast beginning dig out of a history-making blizzard. parts of the region, including the hardest hit
to pope john paul ii. he talked to people about how his demise seemed somewhat of a dishonorable end to his papacy. he had in his mind already what type of glorious exit, to use the phrase, he may want in store for him. let's get some perspective as to what is coming out of the vatican as to why this is happening, what it means. john allen, our senior vatican analyst, joins us now. what do we know, john? >> reporter: what we know is that we are living through a day of enormous shock here in rome. not so much the pope benedict xvi chose to resign. he signaled two years ago that he would be open to doing that, but the fact that we had absolutely no indication this was coming today. precisely because of that, therefore, there are some enormous unanswered questions about how all of this is going to play out. i suppose the biggest questions would be, "a," what will the role of a retired pope be? will he continue to play any kind of public role? will he continue to exercise any influence on the future direction of catholicism almost whether he wants to or not? and the second obvious questi
, and the world has listened to him and he inherited from john paul a stage. he filled it not quite as largely but filled it very adequately with the authority of his teachings, not by power. >> reporter: and when we say listen to him, the world listens to the pope, whether it is benedict, john paul or whoever the next one might be. >> well, as a matter of fact, that's true. succession is the word. one succeeded the other succeeded the other on the basis of what we believe. >> reporter: we talked about it a lot and i talked to cardinal dolan about it. cardinal mccarrick and certainly cardinal dolan plays down any talk of him being the next pope but the fact of an american being the pope does not look like it's in the cards now. >> that's been said for a long time. but to be very honest, i think that the fact that we have taken the lead on the abuse crisis may well be -- may be the joker. it may well be that someone looks to having done extraordinary work in that field. >> reporter: and we see also now the pope who has arrived, looks like to me at the helipad area. this again is at the vatican
. >> and john paul would have been. >> a movie star. >> that gives you a sense of the different temperaments. yet the emotion that is now being really demonstrated as these cardinals say farewell face to face for the last time, all of them kissing the fisherman's ring which we know will be defaced and destroyed which benedict xvi's papacy ends. >> that's right. there are two instruments of the papal office, one is the ring and one is the official papal seal. the seal is kept in a safe in an office in the vatican. of course in the middle ages as you know, christiane be these were what were used to stamp paper bulls. which made them official. after a papacy had ended, someone might use the instruments to falsify papal documents. that's where the custom of destroying them came from. that will be honored at the end of benedict's papacy as well. >> thank you. we'll continue to watch this with all of you. back to you, john and zoraida in new york. >> it is interesting to see this as history is being made at the vatican. pope benedict xvi saying good-bye to the cardinals who have assembled and many
of crowds we thought we saw when pope john paul died. this pope is deeply loved by the very sincere and devoted and devout roman catholics but he is considered more of an intellectual and somebody who is never emotional like john paul the ii. still heartfelt by his devotees. >> all the cardinals are there. >> they are pretty much all here and they have had the time to gather because of his resignation which was announced a couple of weeks ago. the first formal meeting will happen on monday. only then will they decide what day to establish the conclaf and then they will start their secret deliberations. we are told around the 9th, 10th, 11th of march. >> all week we have been focusing on the controversy in cardinal mahoney's role in electing of the new pope. he has been stripped after thousands of pages revealed his role in shielding priests from justice. the nauseating story from 360's gary tuckman. >> reporter: the first time is when he helped bring them to the ashch diocese of los angeles. the ashch bishop of mexico city wanted him gone because of his quote homosexual problem. tho
all, we know his predecessor, john paul ii, wasn't this good health for the last several months and people wondered would it be time for him to step down. he's done the noble thing. >> and you know of course people will speculate right away is this the noble thing, is it truly what he's saying. or is it something more to which you were alluding earlier, there has been so many crises during his papacy, the butler who leaked the documents, the book written because of it with all the problems, financial problems. you can't use a credit card right now at the vatican because the banks are suspicious of money laundering. there are a lot of problems within the vatican. do you suspect that could have anything to do with this? >> i think all of that and more quite frankly. he's 85 years of age. how many world leaders function at 85. >> we've had popes who was too old, too sick to almost even speak and yet went to his death reigning as pope. >> and i think this is better. from one lay american's perspective, i don't think we want to see another instance as much as we love pope john paul i
at the vatican. pope benedict carries the stigma of not being as popular as his predecessor, john paul ii. the monsignor of the shrine in washington puts it in perspective. >> christ was controversial. the things that jesus did. the way that he reached out to people. the way he talked to people. the types of people he talked to. it upsettle, many people. >> reporter: and tom roberts points out that pope benedict will be remembered as well for doing more to actually address the abuse scandal than his predecessor john paul ii ever did. wolf. >> as you know, pope benedict was also involved in a controversy in the united states over the actions of some american nuns. remind our viewers about this. >> reporter: that's right, not long ago, some american nuns challenged the church's teachings on home sexuality, on the male only priesthood. they supported obama's health care plan when the church spoke out against it. these nuns ended up being reprimanded. the nuns got a lot of support within the united states for their actions. it was controversial for the pope. he was also prompted to do that by
, in our lifetime, pope paul the vi was in his 80s and pope john paul ii was 85. it depends. it depends. what the cardinals are looking for, what the cardinals are seeking in someone to take pope benedict's place, in my mind, we watched pope john paul become a grandfather. pope benedict walked out on the world stage as a grandfather, it was a interesting and different experience of his fatherly qualities, as you know, from having met him, the gentle kind way that he had. but, you know, i think that depends on what the college of cardinals is looking for. pope benedict was a teacher and he spent his time teaching and he taught well and with great clarity. so, it is a matter of preference of the college of cardinals and as we believe in the church the working of the holy spirit. >> we will stay in close touch with you, bishop. thank you so much, and thank you for everything that you have done. thanks for inviting me to catholic university, i appreciate it and thank you for coming here to the situation room. >> it was great to be with you, wolf, you take care. god bless. >> a guy with a un
pope john paul died and then when the next conclave elected pope benedict xvi. this pope is deeply loved by the very sincere and devoted and devout roman catholics, but he's considered more of a professor, more of a theologian, more of an intellectual, someone who was more of an intellectual than pope john paul. >> any idea when the conclave will begin to select the new pope? they're all there. >> reporter: they are pretty much all here, and they had a time to gather at his resignation, which was announced a couple weeks ago. they're not all here yet, and we understand that the first formal meeting of all the cardinals will happen on monday, and only then will they decide what date to actually establish the first day of the conclave, and at that point those cardinals who are eligible to vote will start their secret deliberations. we're not sure when. we're told somewhere potentially around the 9th, 10th, 11th of march. >> christiane, i appreciate it. >>> he's been stripped of public duties after thousands of pages, thousands of pages of internal church documents revealed his role a
john paul or this pope -- is there any sense of appetite given these issues that are, you no, tearing apart the church in many ways, that there's going to be change. there a mandate for the new pope to do something that will be meaningful and effective? >> well, michael, actually, to be honest, it's not just most it is all of the 115 cardinals who will vote in the conclave who are were appointed by john paul ii or pope benedict xvi. the things like ordination of women in the priesthood, i do not believe it's realistic to think that whoever emerges from the sistine chapel is the next pope of the catholic church is going to overturn church teachings on those points. i do think what is perhaps not only realistic, but quite probable, is that one thing that is very much going to be on the minds of the cardinals who are electing the next pope, whatever else they do, it is critical to make sure whoever they pick has a profile of having clean hands on the crisis, that is, he has to come across as part of the solution to this crisis rather than part of the problem. >> john, thanks so much for
predecessor pope john paul ii. americans are saying perhaps there needs to be a new direction. 51% say it should stay the same. what sort of reforms do you think should happen? >> you're asking me the $64 million question. but i think definitely we have to keep continuing to involve the laypeople. we don't have enough priests. we should have more priests. we should work on that. the holy father has done that. bishops around the country, around the world have done that. we haven't done it well enough. we must keep praying for it. we must keep attracting the young people, priests and religious, too. we need wonderful religious women to continue the teaching functions, the peacemaking function of our world. >> do you think, as some have subjected, including cardinal o'brien because of the problems that he's in, have decided not to come to this conclave but he said that he thought it was time that priests should be allowed to marry. that discussion should happen. 58% of american catholics think the priests should be allowed to marry. can you imagine that happening and do you think that wou
political relevant today in some ways that it's ever been. think about it. we saw during john paul's reign that he played a central role in the collapse of european communism by inspiring the solidarity movement in poland. the people's power movement in the philippines that brought down the marxist regime would never have happened without the political involvement of the catholic church. scholars these days are writing books about the revenge of god, that religion is making a comeback as a political player. two-thirds of the 1.2 billion catholics in the world today live outside the west, and most live in societies where religion is critically important, so, yeah, i would say there's still some gas left in the church's political gas tank. >> john, real quickly, only a couple of seconds left here, but what do you know specifically in regards to what they are looking for for a pope? stances on abortion, same-sex marriage, that kind of thing. >> reporter: well, all these cardinals have been appointed by john paul and benedict so they are all in agreement on the main. of course they are looking
, will it be a pope outside of europe? there hasn't been an italian pope since before john paul ii, who is polish and then we had our german pope with pope benedict. could it be an african pope, latin pope, a younger pope, and also a pope that could lead the church out of these sex abuse scandals. >> what's the possibility of it being a pope with a bit more diversity? >> it's quite likely. it could happen. but it's always been difficult to predict who the next pope will be. and often times the predictions run afoul. they turn out not to be correct. >> okay. so how does the catholic church -- how does the vatican then shake this bad press? and to move forward, to look for the next pope? >> well, i think that the cardinals who are tasked with the selection of the next pope have a big task. and they will be sequestered in the sistine chapel, and they will, according to the rules, pray and try to select the next pope through prayer, politicking is looked down upon. but before they go into the chapel, they hear two sermons about the future of the church and what the next pope should be attending to. s
benedict is no longer the pope, he has to give up the shoes but remember, john paul ii wore the red shoes for a couple weeks early on in his pontificate, then wore brown ones. the pope can really do what he wants. he's the supreme pontiff, the supreme ruler of the church and he kind of can make the rules himself and benedict made these himself today. >> interesting. although as you said, raymond, i say this, you know, can't change the doctrine, right? you do everything. >> can't do that. he can protect the doctrine but not amend it. >> let me talk about one other thing. he wears a ring, fisherman's ring. describe it to me and why he's going to actually destroy it. it looks kind of fluorescent green or yellow on his finger. >> now, this goes back to 1265. pope clement iv referenced this ring in one of his letters to a nephew. it is the sign and seal of his office. when you look closely, you are seeing a picture there, it is a bas relief of st. peter leaning over the edge of the boat pulling in fish. this shows and indicates that the pope, whoever wears this ring, is the successor of st. pe
for this pope, but pope john paul ii, as well. the question of the pedophile scandals, the ongoing financial problems or complications or scandals of the vatican bank, which had a new president appointed on this last friday. obviously, there's a lot of talk about the changing nature of the catholic church. today, only one in four catholics lives in europe. most live in north america, south america, asia and africa. so, really, it's going to be a time for the church to redefine itself looking towards those areas where its numbers are growing. christi? >> going to be interesting to see if they choose a pope that is european or perhaps of another heritage. thank you, ben wedemen, we appreciate you bringing us the latest from rome there. >>> coming up in our 8:00 hour, we'll look at the intrigue and the secrecy in the church, as well as hollywood's obsession with the vatican. >>> so, i want to get you to washington now. take a look at this live picture of one beautiful sunrise. good morning to all of you waking up in that in d.c. and you know what else, folks are waking up to a first draft of th
. the cardinal from argentina who is with the chief of staff under john paul ii, a very good manager. but the truth is this is all sound and fury signifying nothing until those 117 cardinals who are under 80 and have the right to vote for the next pope get here to rome, roll up their sleeves, and get to work. >> and is that done in the same way we've seen in years past after the pope has died, the white smoke, the black smoke, and all of that? >> reporter: that's right. in fact, it will be very shortly from now that they'll get the process ready. they'll have to put in a fake floor like they did last time to put in jamming devices that will prohibit anyone from eavesdropping electronically what is going on in the sistine chapel. also, they'll install a stove and prepare the chemical cartridges that will turn the black smoke into white smoke when they've elected the pope. >> and, john, what will he do next? is he referred to as like a former pope? where will he live? what will he do? >> reporter: he's got another month on the job, so we're presuming he's going to carry out his regular
. the other 50 were appointed by his predecessor, pope john paul ii. so, directly, no, he will not have any input into the conclave, but, indirectly, because he had such an important role in appointing those cardinals, he will have some role to play, but not directly, as i said. christi? >> ben wedemen, thank you so much as we look at live pictures there from vatican tv. >>> coming up in our 8:00 hour here, we'll take a closer look at the intrigue and the secrecy in the church, as well as hollywood's obsession with the vatican, you know, it's there. >>> i want to talk to you about what's happening back here at home. a blinding whiteout in detroit. this is on a major freeway. no immediate reports of fatal y fatalities. 44 vehicles that collided saturday on interstate 75. listen it to this couple who was caught in the middle of that i-75 smash up. >> it was just like somebody suddenly threw a white sheet across the windshield and we couldn't see anything. >> you could hear all the cars banging. >> detroit is not the only place getting snow. here's meteorologist samantha mohr with more of our
is exhausted? >> i was surprised. first time in over 600 years. i know john paul ii, whom we knew quite well, went through a lot more ordeals and i think more health problems than pope benedict, but i don't -- i'm not in a position to criticize. i don't know what his status of health is. >> but if an american president retired on the grounds of exhaustion, they would be ridiculed, wouldn't it? >> i think it wasn't just exhaustion, but he wasn't able to handle the mental challenges to handle his job. it's up to him to make a decision. not been done much in the past. >> a lot of people when i said i was interviewing you. >> yes. >> said to me, as long as last time, said he's the greatest post president america has ever had. is that compliment or a veiled insult? >> i take it as a compliment. my wife would take it maybe as a veiled insult. we did a lot of good things when we brought peace to egypt. we formed an alliance with china after 35 years, we told the truth, we kept our country at peace for four years, which is a rare thing. >> incredibly rare. >> i think we -- peace and human rights. >>
's not worn his heart on his sleeve. he's very different from his predecessor john paul ii who was all about hugs and embracing. yes, this was a day of rare emotion. you saw a lot of smiles as he went around st. peter's square in that pope mmobile to receive the final farewells. he spoke about how he had so much joy, he said, in the church in his eight years of reign but he also talked about how there had been difficult times. he said it had been fair from easy on occasion. he talk tbd church coming across agitated waters and finding themselves facing different directions of the wind. obviously he was talking about various crises and issues that the pope has to deal with and the church has to deal with,al those close to home who have rocked and buffeted those for years, most significantly the priests who have preyed upon young boy and an effort to hold those accountable, whose who did it and those who shielded the priests from scandal and accountability. all that is going on at the same time. more matterly as we await the conclave to convene and await the next pope, everybody's waiting. that
, at the beginning of the papacy of john paul ii. one of of the reasons it's in a better place today is because of pope benedict. who as cardinal ratzinger, he didn't get it at the beginning, but he listened and he learned and he pushed and he threw hundreds of priests out -- bad priests out of the priesthood. so the church is in a much better position today. mostly due to pope benedict than it was in the past. >> yeah, a lot of -- great to get your thoughts. a lot of people, of course, would disagree and still a lot of angst and a lot of people who say that the pontiff was stymied at attempts for reform. we will see what happens the next time around. we do appreciate your thoughts. reverend thomas reese, jesuit priest. thanks for your time today. >>> the last week and a half we have heard blt murder allegations against oscar pistorius, but he is not the only family member who's now in trouble. >> carl pistorius is facing homicide charges. all about a traffic accident. we'll have that story coming up. so...how'd it go? well, dad, i spent my childhood living with monks learning the art of dealma
, john allen, who's one of the more perceptive ones. he said the legacy of john paul ii we're not going to fully appreciate until years from now and one of benedict's main job is going to be to help us unpack that ponticate. so they're going to be voluminous but it will take a while. i can rattle a few off. >> reporter: give me two. >> i would say the deep theological pro fundity than been expressed with amazing clarity and child-like simplicity. and second i would say his constant call that the church needs to be engaged with the world in culture. you know, christiane, there's some voices in the church today saying we need to retreat to the cat combs. we need to circle the wagons. ben xvi said the church is in the world. there's tons more if you ever want to invite me back. we'll go through his accomplishments. thank you, good to be with you. >> reporter: cardinal dolan, thank you very much for joining us. back to you, chris and erin. >> what a great interview, first of all. kudos for christiane. for people watching all over the world, you just got a look at what makes cardinal dolan s
back in november, right? >> that's right. and when john paul ii when he was introduced to him by benedict he said i assure you he's made his first communion, he's so young. that's the comment that benedict made to john paul ii. why i'm interested in talking a bit about him is because he's so humble. when he was bishop in the philippines, he would ride his bicycle. he would encounter all the pool on the streets. he would invite the poor in his residence to eat. there's a story about a woman who was looking for her alcoholic out-of-work husband expecting to find him in the local bar, she found him in the residence with the bishop eating lunch. he spoke very vo shumbly at thet meeting that we need someone with a lot of humbleness and silence. people are saying, wow, wouldn't it be something. he's no slouch, he studied in america, summa cum laude . >> many people said it might be an opportunity to have an african as pope, and cardinal peter turksa of ghana. >> a few strikes against him, one he's already spoken about it to the press -- >> like the cia, forget it. >> he didn't say i
, this thing has been covered up. and what you have now is, you know, 2005, i was here when pope john paul ii died, and we had the conclave for pope benedict xvi election. now, at that time there was a lot of criticism that cardinal bernard law was coming here to take part in that conclave. at that time the vatican said that it's up to -- it's his duty, and he should come. now they're changing their tone somewhat about these others who are embroiled in these scandals and saying, well, it's up to him. they don't want now, here in the vatican, to take responsibility for these cardinals coming here. they're saying no, it's up to him. and obviously many of them were hoping that they wouldn't come. >> christiane amanpour working for us at the vatican and father albert cutie, thank you both for your input. >>> as we move along, here are two things you never want to hear in the same sentence, horse meat and ikea meatballs. it's happened and we'll explain after this break. card rewards are easy to remember with the bankamericard cash rewards credit card. earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. [ bo
okay yesterday to me and predecessor pope john paul survived two assassination attempts, various cancer scares, crippling arthritis, and you had parkinson's as well. yet he battled on for 27 years. it does seem on the face of it very strange that pope benedict would walk away amid all the scandals being told and in the media of a secret gaye network of clergy inside the vatican, the financial mismanagement and the firing of archbishop cardinal keith o'brien of inappropriate behavior towards priests in the '80s. when you put it altogether, where are we left, do you think? >> i take the pope on his word. he is 85 years of age. his health is declining. he knows his health is going to continue to decline. i am not surprised. modern medicine can keep us physically alive long after we can do the kind of job that it requires to be, to have the strength, the mental ability to do that kind of job, so it was inevitable that sometime during the 21st century we have a pope resign for a reason like this. now, you know, with regards to all of these scandals and stories that are in the italian press,
of information 2005 when pope john paul died and as we watched the election of pope benedict xvi. obviously it had already come out in the unite and there are lots of reports but hadn't exploded in europe. i'm talking to vatican insiders and watchers who say this may explode in other parts of the world as well, that it is a bit of a ticking timebomb. in that regard, it is different. clearly the church is really -- they just simply can't believe that all these headlines are happening the very final week of pope benedict's reign. so they're desperately trying to get out from under this deluge of bad news and hope at least the next two days are going to be much more devoted to the final religious tasks of pope benedict. tomorrow he has his final general audience. they've handed out tens of thousands of tickets. st. peter's square behind me is going to be filled. there's going to be the traditional popemobile circular around st. peter's square. then the gradual ceremonial steps that are going to be taken before pope benedict xvi leave. but unprecedented in this way and, of course, because this
. i was here when pope john paul ii died in 2005, and it was completely different atmosphere. on this occasion, very much an opportunity for people, the faithful, to come and contemplate the legacy of pope benedict. many appreciated him as a teacher, a thinker, an intellectual. somebody who had the courage to confront many of the issues that have plagued the church over the last decade or so. the question of, for instance, pedophilia and the priesthood and other things. very much what they heard from people is they appreciated him as someone who faced and grappled with serious issues and appreciated the fact that he had the courage to step down at this point in his life. >> ben wedeman for thus morning. thank you for the update. you can hear them breaking down from the mass said a little bit this morning. here is what will happen from now on from here. pope benedict xvi has amended the conclave law. they don't have to wait for 16 days after the papacy is vacant. cardinals under the age of 80 will take part. four ballots a day. b ballots get counted twice daily. and dark smoke
who will be voting were appointed either by john paul ii or benedict xvi and on the big picture issues they are all of one mind. i think it's quite unlikely the next pope is going to ordain women or repeal church teaching on abortion or gay marriage or those kinds of issues. now on the other hand, i would certainly say from my own experience of talking to cardinals the more thoughtful among them realize the church has a woman's problem. they understand there are a lot of sisters who feel the same way as our guest does and it's not just nuns, lots of women generally feel that way. i think the next pope will face this difficult challenge of trying to reach out to women and assuring them there's a place for them in the church while at the same time drawing a line in the sand on the ordinary nation question. >> when you say that they're going to select the new pope and they're going to think outside the box and they're maybe going to south america or africa to choose the next pope, they're really not thinking outside the box though, are they? maybe they are in picking a pope from another c
people who see, who saw in benedict and blessed john paul ii a voice that really resonates, a challenge, you can live this gospel. it's possible to bring love and truth and peace into the world, and we call it the kingdom of god, the rest of society calls it a better world. they're the same thing, to bring into this world peace, justice, truth, kindness, compassion, care, and that's what the pope keeps saying over and over and over again. the exciting thing is we have loads of new england people saying you know that's right, i'd like to be a part of that. >> cardinal wuerl, if you are elected pope we would like to have you back, come and join us on the set of the show. >> actually if you're elected pope we'll talk to you there. we don't want to talk to you here. we'll talk to you there. road trip, road trip. >>> trending this morning, i want to tell you for folks who don't want coffee in the morning there's a new mountain dew soda, a drink, why it's already controversial, that's ahead. (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infini
and into his studies. he goes on short walks, but he unlike john paul ii was not for long hikes. >> thank you very much. here in the united states, american catholics are divided on the future of their church. catholi catholic split from what they want. 46% want change and the pape as tow go in a new direction. 51% said stay traditional. live from new york is the host of the busted halo show on the catholic channel on sirius fm. welcome. as we were pointing out potential next popes, me three things you want to see in this next leader. >> because we refer to the hope as the vicker of christ, the epicentative of our lord jesus christ on earth, he has to be a man who reminds us of our lord jesus. can you say sure, a lot of believers do that. you don't have to be the pope to do that, but to show the compassion and the love and the mercy of jesus christ is one. another would be at this time in our church's history, we need a unifier. there is a lot of division not only around the world, not only here in the united states, but even within the burocracy of the workings of the vatican. we heard that
stepped down, because, remember, he watched john paul ii's demise and watched his powers fade, and what happens when a pope declines in power, the bureaucracy in inevitably increases. and i don't think he particularly enjoyed what was happening aat that time and may be seeing tremors again. and he decided to go ahead and retire early. >> let's stay on successors for a moment. any possibility that an american would -- we have dolan on there. is there any possibility we could see an american pope? >> i love cardinal dolan. i have known him since he was a priest. if i could elect a pope, i would elect dolan. but half of these election fors are europeans, the other half are predominantly africans and asians. the likelihood of them electing an american pope is remote. america has such a huge influence on the world to give them a papacy would be a bridge too far. that was the mind-set into the last conclave. look for a european, right now, if you were -- you know, begging me to give you an answer, i would probably say look at cardinal oullette from canada, who the pope incidentally sort of an
he addressed you first but he and benedict would chat when benedict was waiting to see pope john paul. >> completely open. >> reporter: what was he like to talk to? >> very -- he would ask me what my interests were and how i felt and how i saw things. >> reporter: and with a sense of humor, like when benedict offered to sign widmer's copy of a book that he written which was pretty thick. >> when i gave it to him he said, you're really reading this? and i said, i'm trying. he said, it helps to do it in small steps. >> reporter: but he also had a personal crisis as a guard, spending his first christmas away from home. john paul helped him through that. >> i sort of had a meltdown and right at that moment he comes out of his apartment and he noticed and he reached out to me and he thanked me for being there and he gave me courage. >> reporter: what were you doing? were you crying? >> yeah. >> reporter: you were? >> i stopped crying but he in theed my red eyes. >> reporter: as for what's to come, the top job isn't what we think. >> the pope is the end of your life. you have to give up all
the memory of benedict's predecessor, john paul ii. have a listen to this. >> people said, if anyone should have resigned, it was he. parkinson parkinson's, couldn't get around. i think it is the image, the visual image of a man incapacitated. people say, well, how much is he really doing that? how much does he have his hands on the pulse of what is happening? >> chris cuomo this morning. father, do you think just straight up do you think his successor might find wisdom in the notion of hanging it up early, maybe set a precedent here? >> i agree with the quotations of the priest. we need a person, a leader, a real leader with good health, a wise man, continuing to train and i agree with benedict sistine and he has few guideline -- very clear, if i don't have the health, spirituality, mentality, and everything, i will resign. and it is simple for us. the doctrine is continuing to be the same. i think it is an example for everybody, the leader, the church, continuing. it is much better. resign now. >> italian popes, think of polish, currently german. looking at the statistics and the numbers
, and he looks frail, looks old, but he seemed to be enjoying himself. john paul ii is very much a more engaging pope and not as much as a private man as benedict xvi is. he will leave here tomorrow around this time, by helicopter, and he will go to castle gandolpho and come back to the vatican in his retirement. he'll go into isolation, he's chosen that for himself. the vatican garden cottage as it were, it's not particularly comfortable, i'm told, i haven't been in, but it is somewhere he can spend his twilight years as it were, and he's 85 years old, let's remember that, in peace and reflecting on where he is, who he is, and how far he's come. today was very much an occasion of reflection for the 100,000 or so people who were here, brooke. it was absolutely amazing. we were up there, right at vatican city there and it was a sense of quiet, even though there are over 100,000 people there, so i say, a time of reflection and peace for so many of the faith. brooke? >> and history being made and now less than 24 hours from now, where you are in rome, becky anderson, my thanks to you. >>>
fiery end, john. >> paul vercammen covering this developing story for us. thank you. >>> we want to move on to the president's state of the union address. the president laying out his vision for a second term. last night, challenging republicans to work with him. the speech seemed to hit home with a majority of americans. 53% had a very positive reaction. 24% somewhat positive and 22% reacted negatively. still, a majority of speech watchers, 53%, do not believe this will lead to more bipartisan cooperation. glass half full, glass half empty. brianna keilar here to talk about the speech. >> i think the polls might be on to something, john. president obama talked a lot about the economy, deficit reduction is lone is not an economic plan and with some echoes of the campaign, he talked about investing in the middle class, through education, clean energy investments, and an increase in the minimum page. economic measures that quite swiftly republicans rejected. >> we can say with renewed confidence that the state of our union is stronger. >> reporter: in the first state of the union address o
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